#1 2010-11-26 19:03:41

ingoberg
Member
Registered: 2010-11-20
Posts: 17

Demos

I'm interested in understanding this framework, but it is hard with these demos.

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#2 2010-11-27 12:32:49

ab
Administrator
From: France
Registered: 2010-06-21
Posts: 14,203
Website

Re: Demos

So you're welcome posting in this forum to get some light.

Take a look also at the documentation, available as said in http://synopse.info/forum/viewtopic.php?id=55

What exactly is dark for you?
Post your questions here, whatever they are.
There are no silly questions, only void answers. smile

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#3 2010-11-28 21:39:50

ingoberg
Member
Registered: 2010-11-20
Posts: 17

Re: Demos

For example, how should I use the TSQLTable object. Should I be using it to create, update and delete records? Should I use it to store records before I do a batch update? Should I be using the NewRecord method of the Table object?

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#4 2010-11-29 07:07:23

ab
Administrator
From: France
Registered: 2010-06-21
Posts: 14,203
Website

Re: Demos

0. Forget anything about TClientDataSet, TQuery, the DB unit and all component-driven/RAD database design;

1. Read the REST concept part of the documentation;

2. Read the ORM part of the documentation;

3. Read the documentation about TSQLRest/TSQLRestClient and TSQLRecord, especially the TSQLRest[Client].Retrieve/Add/Delete/Update/BeginTransaction/Commit/Rollback methods

4. See all suppled samples code to get the client/server and ORM approach;

5. Read the documentation about TSQLTable and TSQLTableJSON;

6. Search the forum (see button top of this screen) about TSQLTable and everything you want to know. A lot of code is already available here. For example http://synopse.info/forum/viewtopic.php?pid=272#p272

7. Post a new thread in this forum for any precise question.

About TSQLTable.NewRecord, as stated by the documentation, it's only useful if you want to have a particular TSQLRecord instance during TSQLTable access. Usually, you'll have to use TSQLRecord.Create, just as for usual objects. Remember that in an ORM, you work with objects, then use the TSQLRestClient instance for persistence.

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